Wednesday, August 2, 2017

How Did People Fund Health Care Before Group Insurance?

One question people should ask in a health care debate is: How did people fund health care before insurance?

Well, people funded their health care through savings. Often doctors would render service on credit and there were charities for people who needed care beyond their resources.

Wait a second: This thing called "The Medical Savings and Loan" funds care through a combination of savings, a loan reserve and grants.

Something seems very fishy.

Okay, I will finally divulge what I've been up to.

This thing I call "The Medical Savings and Loan" is really just a formalized model of traditional health care.

While working at an insurance company, I asked myself the fundamental question: Does group health insurance do a better job of funding care than traditional methods?

I simply created a mathematical model for traditional health care and insurance based care. The simulations I ran kept showing that traditional care provided greater care for the working poor and small business than insurance.

Insurance benefits the upper middle class and the uber-rich at the cost of the working class.

The big problem with traditional care is that it lacked a good accounting system. The system did not give people adequate information about the amount of money they needed to save. It did a poor job tracking how much people spent on health care and it did a poor job of identifying the people who needed additional help.

We live in the Information Age. What I wanted to do was to create a distributed database so that people could track their care. Realizing that people would have a hard time interfacing with the system, I realized that this new program would create a need for a new position called which I called "A Health Care Advocate."

To streamline the lending process, I created a thing called a Loan Reserve. I also created a streamlined process for administering grants.

With this model in hand, I can prove that a savings based model of health care delivers better care to the working poor and middle class than the insurance model.

I argue that if one enhanced traditional care with health care advocates and a good data reporting system, we could easily create a health care system that would put all other health care systems to shame.

What I've been doing for the last eight years is simply trying to find people brave enough to discuss the mathematics of health care.

The actual system I am discussing isn't really radical. It is just a formalized version of traditional care. I enhance traditional care with an accounting system and a position called "The Health Care Advocate."

My presentation also discusses how one can incrementally transition from the insurance model to a savings based model.

The program can replace ObamaCare without disruption. Quite frankly it is likely to get more resources to the people in need. All I need to do is find people brave enough to discuss the mathematics of health care.

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